Assistive Devices

Description:
The service aims to supply, prescribe, maintain and recycle assistive devices such as wheel chairs and walkers and hearing aids to people who need them.

There are various centres in the regions where assistive devices can be prescribed, maintained and repaired:

  • Metropole - Western Cape Rehabilitation Centre at the Conradie Hospital and Karl Bremer Sites in Cape Town.
  • Cape Winelands District - Brewelskloof Hospital (repair the assistive devices referred to them via therapists).
  • There are four sites in the West Coast District, which are based at the following hospitals: Citrusdal Hospital, Clanwilliam Hospital, Vredendal Hospital and Vredenburg Hospital.
  • The Eden/Central Karoo District has six sites: George Hospital, Oudtshoorn Hospital, Mossel Bay Hospital, Riversdale Hospital, Knysna Hospital and Beaufort West Hospital.

In general, assistive devices are in short supply throughout the Western Cape. Services are frequently reliant on donations for second-hand items and the purchase of new equipment.

Instructions:
To get a wheelchair, or in the case of children a buggy (pushcart), you should go to the nearest primary health care centre which offers this service. You will be assessed by an occupational therapist, physiotherapist or orthopaedic aftercare sister and a decision about the correct assistive device, if necessary, will be made.

You may be referred to the Western Cape Rehabilitation Centre for individualised and specialised wheel-chair/buggy seating.

First-time visitors to the clinic or secondary or tertiary hospital will be asked to fill out a form and a folder will be opened. Bring your ID book, or in the case of a child, the Road to Health Card. If you need an assistive device, you must ask for the orthopaedic aftercare sister or physiotherapist/occupational therapist at the nearest clinic or community health centre/district hospital.

Provided At: These facility categories:
Provided by:
Government Body: (Western Cape Government)
Price:
A wheelchair will cost about R395, which can be used for life. The buggy costs R25 and must be returned to the state if it is no longer needed. The buggy will be re-sold but at a lower cost. All assistive devices can be paid off in monthly instalments.

Following Health Minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang's announcement that a free health care policy for people with disabilities would come into operation on July 1, 2003, this service should be free. This covers outpatient visits and admissions to hospitals, and includes disability aids such as wheelchairs and hearing aids. The free service should include people who have permanent disabilities that have resulted in moderate to severe difficulty in living a normal life, older people who are considered frail, and long-term patients in institutions for mental health care. The criteria for assessments and exactly how this will be implemented are currently being investigated.

The content on this page was last updated on 5 September 2013