Junior Traffic Training Centre launched at Hoopsig | Western Cape Government

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2021
(Western Cape Government)
115

Junior Traffic Training Centre launched at Hoopsig

25 March 2021

Children get to know the rules of the road

From now on, Paternoster’s children are expected to be much safer in traffic, thanks to the establishment of a Junior Traffic Training Centre (JTTC) established at Hoopsig. 

Hoopsig, the educational support and life skills centre of the Paternoster Project non-profit company, became the proud recipient of a child-friendly traffic training facility – one of the very JTTCs not attached to a school.

The colourful facility was launched on 25 March 2021 to a group of excited children who were eager to the rules of the road and the meaning of various signs. “We are so fortunate to have this facility. Our children are used to roaming the village with their dogs. The marked increase in visitor traffic is putting them at peril,” said Shemoné Bokhary, the programme manager at Hoopsig.

JTTCs are part of a programme implemented by the Directorate: Road Safety Management (RSM) of the Western Cape Department of Transport and Public Works on behalf of the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC).

The aim of these training facilities is to teach primary school learners about road safety in a play environment, without exposing them to the dangers of real traffic situations.

According to RSM’s Lizel Plaatjies, there has been a tragic increase in pedestrian deaths across the country over the last three years. Pedestrians account for almost half of all deaths on South African roads.

“This JTTC will allow RSM and the community to continue with vital and life-saving education. We sincerely hope this facility will help to bring down pedestrian deaths in the Paternoster area,” Plaatjies said.

Enquiries: Joan Kruger 083 556 1913