Little Karoo

2005
(Department of Cultural Affairs & Sport, Western Cape Government)
This area is the fertile valley enclosed by the Swartberg, Langeberg and the Outeniqua mountains. The area was explored by European settlers from the late 17th century, who encountered Khoisan people living here. The semi-arid area was turned into a productive farming district. This area boasts the most spectacular rock formations and passes. Well-known mission stations situated here are Zoar, Amalienstein and Dysselsdorp.
Click here for a map of the Little Karoo.

Zoar and Amalienstein (Not far from the Hoeko turnoff, about 21 km from Ladismith) The Zoar settlement was established in 1817 by Petrus Johannes Joubert, a missionary of the South African Missionary Society. He named the mission station after the biblical name "Zoar". When Joubert left in 1833 the South African Missionary Society found it difficult to replace him, and called in the help of the Berlin Mission Society which bought the adjacent land and set up its own station and named it "Amalienstein", after its benefactress, Frau Amalie von Stein. Here a church (1853), school and houses were erected. Zoar was run by Reinhold Gregorowski of the Berlin Mission Society from 1837. In 1838 Zoar had a church and huts forming a village which was inhabited by 300 to 400 Khoekhoen people. The inhabitants were taught farming methods and religious instruction and received an education. After emancipation, slaves settled at the mission stations.
Tel: 028 561 1000
Zoar Church
Zoar Church
House in Zoar
House in Zoar
The content on this page was last updated on 4 September 2013